Earth and Planetary Science
EPS Atmosphere, Oceans, and Climate

66 million-year-old deathbed linked to dinosaur-killing meteor

In a new paper in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, paleontologist Robert DePalma and his colleagues, including Walter Alvarez a Professor of the Graduate School and Professor Mark Richards from University of California, Berkeley Earth and Planetary Sciences, describe the site, dubbed Tanis, and the evidence connecting it with the asteroid or comet strike off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula 66 million years ago. That impact created a huge crater, called Chicxulub, in the ocean floor and sent vaporized rock and cubic miles of asteroid dust into the atmosphere. The cloud eventually enveloped Earth, setting the stage for Earth’s last mass extinction.

“It’s like a museum of the end of the Cretaceous in a layer a meter-and-a-half thick,” said Mark Richards, a UC Berkeley professor emeritus of earth and planetary science who is now provost and professor of earth and space sciences at the University of Washington.

Richards and Walter Alvarez, a UC Berkeley Professor of the Graduate School who 40 years ago first hypothesized that a comet or asteroid impact caused the mass extinction, were called in by DePalma and Dutch scientist Jan Smit to consult on the rain of glass beads and the tsunami-like waves that buried and preserved the fish. The beads, called tektites, formed in the atmosphere from rock melted by the impact.

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(Graphic courtesy of Robert DePalma)