Earth and Planetary Science
EPS Planetary Science

MAR 2010 - Helium rain on Jupiter explains lack of neon in atmosphere

In a recent paper published in Physical Review Letters, EPS postdoc Hugh Wilson and faculty member Burkhard Militzer report calculations showing that the large deficiency of neon in the atmosphere of Jupiter observed by the Galileo probe can be explained by the existence of a hydrogen-helium immiscibility layer deep within the planet. The new calculations show that neon atoms are absorbed into helium-rich droplets which then rain deeper into the planet's interior, leading to an atmosphere that is depleted of both helium and neon. Read commentary by J. Fortney, press release from UC Berkeley, helium rain forcast on the Discovery Channel, and LA Times report about helium rain washing away neon.